Lowham Walsh offers a team of scientists ready to tackle a wide variety of environmental issues relating to employee health and safety, indoor environmental quality, and the identification and management of hazardous materials like Lead Based Paint (LBP).   Our dedicated team of environmental scientists and investigators assess open space, industrial, residential and commercial properties to evaluate environmental status and health.  We also benefit from an intimate knowledge of the federal, state, and local regulations, and employ up-to-date technologies (including satellite imagery and GIS). 

Groundwater Monitoring

Our team completed a WDEQ-approved environmental monitoring plan for the Fremont County Solid Waste District. This particular project was for a 30+ well suite of groundwater monitoring wells around a Construction and Demolition Landfill, which formerly accepted Municipal Solid Waste. Groundwater samples were collected according to WDEQ protocol, and the analytical data is tracked using SANITAS software. 

Owl Creek Level I Watershed Study

In 2016 the Wyoming Water Development Commission tasked Lowham Walsh with conducting the Owl Creek Level I Watershed Study and Management Plan. The study involved planning, background research, public meetings, and production of a watershed study for the agriculturally based Owl Creek watershed and surrounding area in Hot Springs County, Wyoming. The project included an ecosystem assessment, including review of existing data and description of all major resources including geology, soils, vegetation, wildlife, ground and surface water hydrology, geomorphology, agricultural cropping and rangeland use, evaluation of water use and water scarcity based on USGS and Wyoming State streamgaging systems compared with agricultural use, evaluation of water quality based on a TMDL evaluation of lower Owl Creek, and a summary of industrial, recreational, and municipal land uses in the project area.

The project team conducted over 40 interviews with landowners to determine current water use and potential ways to improve water use efficiency on private lands. Conceptual engineering designs were developed for nearly 90+ projects for potential small-scale water use improvements such as in-channel diversion structures for irrigation, erosion control designs for eroding banks that incorporate the basics of natural channel design, and water-conserving ditch-to-pipe plans. Our team developed a rapport with local landowners and land management agencies through collaborative meetings and on-site sessions. This included the Natural Resources Conservation Service,  BLM, the local Hot Springs Conservation District, the Wyoming. Information was synthesized into a cohesive plan that describes the natural resources of the watershed, proposes improvements that will use water more efficiently and effectively to protect those resources, and provides information on potential funding sources and permitting requirements for the identified improvements.

Pre-Construction Wind Farm Avian Clearance Surveys

Lowham Walsh biologists conducted pre-construction avian clearance surveys for a private wind farm in northeastern Colorado. Duties on the project included conducting clearance surveys along the transmission line and turbine pad ROW for migratory birds in accordance with the MBTA. Trimble Geo XT handheld GPS units and TerraSync software were used to document all migratory bird and raptor nests in order to buffer and protect nests ahead of and during construction.

Ruby Pipeline Biological Clearance Surveys 

Lowham Walsh biologists conducted extensive biological surveys to investigate the presence of T&E and special status species and habitat along the 676-mile proposed route, compiled a list of construction dates to be restricted due to presence of sensitive species, and assessed the risks posed by construction delays on migratory birds relative to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Our team also surveyed access roads for raptor nests and noted any nests that recreational bird observers identified along the roads and ROW. The species of concern for the biological surveys included greater sage-grouse, northern goshawks and other raptors, burrowing owls, pygmy rabbits, and game animals. The surveys required GPS field surveys with a mobile ArcPad application and development of a project-specific GIS to manage the large volume of data generated by field surveys. Work included documenting and buffering all migratory bird and raptor nests ahead of pipeline ROW clearing using Trimble Geo XT handheld GPS units and ArcPad software. Methods used included grid sweeps by meandering transects, documenting and GPS marking found nests, determining nest status and species, constructing buffers based on USFWS mitigation measures and notifying site personnel, monitoring nests weekly until fledging or nest being deemed inactive, and tracking nests with a database system.  All nests were then monitored until all chicks fledged or the nest was deemed no longer viable. 

Sunpower Solar Projects 

Lowham Walsh biologists conducted biological monitoring for several Sunpower solar energy construction projects in Kings and Kern counties, California. Duties included migratory bird and raptor nest surveys on the ground and on solar arrays, raptor nest monitoring, wetland monitoring, and special status species monitoring. Special status species included Swainson’s hawk,Tipton kangaroo rats, Nelson’s ground squirrel, burrowing owl, and San Joaquin kit fox. Migratory bird surveys included grid sweeps by meandering transects, documenting and GPS marking found nests, determining nest status and species, constructing buffers based on USFWS mitigation measures and notifying site personnel, monitoring nests weekly until fledging or nest being deemed inactive, and tracking nests with a database system.